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Tasting Room Open Daily
11am - 4:30pm

4791 Dry Creek Rd.
Healdsburg, CA

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What's new at Amphora Winery!

Amphora Winery
May 30, 2016 | Amphora Winery

Rose is back, just in time for summer!

Amphora at the Lake

The warm days and evenings of summer beg for a refreshing wine, and we now the perfect one:

2015 Dry Rosé of Zinfandel

To craft this refreshingly crisp wine, we picked ripe Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel just a little earlier than we typically would for full-throttle red wine. After destemming, crushing, and a brief period of skin contact, we pressed off the juice and fermented it at cool temperatures in stainless steel. The result is a fresh and zesty rosé. The pale salmon color invites a sip, and floral and strawberry aromas lead to flavors redolent of peaches and cream, raspberry and a squeeze of tart cherry. This is wine to enjoy now, and that’s we chose to skip bottle and cork in favor of the convenience and portability of a box.  Whether in the fridge door, on the pool deck, or on a boat—take this one along on your summer meanderings!


List price is $78 for the 3-Liter Box (=4 bottles), $58.50 Concierge Club, $62.40 Platinum Club, $66.30 Gold Club.


Time Posted: May 30, 2016 at 3:16 PM
Joelle Kurrus
May 29, 2014 | Joelle Kurrus

Grenache Rose

Ahhh, summertime has arrived in Dry Creek Valley, the bees are buzzing, the grapes are ripening and if you ask me what’s in my glass, I’d give you a smile that says,  the very best of summer drinking, Rosé.  Amphora has just released its box program for this year.  Last year’s offering of Viognier was such a big hit that we bottled well, ahem, boxed up another selection.  The Grenache Rosé sure to become your favorite summer sipper.   This perfect charmer sits in the frig with its little pour spout just ready to serve, and with a handy volume, equivalent to 4, yes, that’s right, 4 bottles, it takes up less space than your jug of milk.

It’s a shame that Rosé is often considered the Rodney Dangerfield of wines,” no respect, no respect at all.”  Julian Street in his book Table Topics (1959) wrote: "He sniffed, tasted, considered; then, with a slow nod of agreement, said: 'Nothing there—like kissing your aunt.'" 

Truth be told Rosé doesn’t, and really, shouldn’t stand up and bark its name at you.  Its subtle, nuanced, delicate flavors harken back to childhood memories of watermelon juice dripping down your chin, fresh cut grass, and pavement after a summer rain. 

Provence can claim the historic first for Rosé production and is also the oldest wine region in France. This region sits along the Mediterranean coast of France, bordered by the Rhone River to the west and the Côte d’Azur on the east. Physically, it’s only about 150 miles long and 100 miles north to south but its impact is profound. Wine has been made here for over 2600 years. It is the only place to focus on Rosé crafted from Cinsualt, Mourvedre, Grenache and Sarah grapes.   

Spanish rosé (rosado) is made almost exclusively from the Grenache grape. Grenache is an intensely fruity grape variety, and rosé benefits from all that fruitiness, getting the most out of its limited time on the skin.  Spain has far more Grenache vineyards than anywhere else, making Spanish rosés deliciously inexpensive.

Amphora has again sourced its Grenache from Clarksburg AVA and we also produce the wine as 100% varietal along side its thrilling little sister.  Our dry rosé of Grenache greets you with summery aromas of strawberry and tart cherry, and follows with quenching red fruit flavors heightened by a spritely mouth-feel and clean finish.  This unfined, unfiltered and unbottled’ summertime treat is only available in out tasting room, only in a 3 Liter box (= four bottles), and only for a limited time!

Retail $78s Little Dipper $66.30s Big Dipper $62.40s Case a Quarter $58.50


Time Posted: May 29, 2014 at 2:12 PM
Joelle Kurrus
May 13, 2014 | Joelle Kurrus

Historic traditions of Paella and Tempranillo

On May 24th Amphora will be hosting its annual “Taste of Spain” event and this year we are abuzz about the plans for the party.  Join us for Paella in our vineyard picnic area beginning at 6:00 pm when Chef Fabiano Ramaci takes center stage and shares his preparation for delicious authentic Spanish Paella.  Settle in with a glass of our delicious Tempranillo, Grenache, or Carignane and watch the sunset while listening to the masterful sounds of Flamenco guitarist Mark Taylor.  This is an event not to be missed and we hope you can join us for the fun. 

In light of this event, I thought I would share some brief information on the wines of Spain as well as some history on Paella; a remarkable meal made in an exquisitely crafted pot.

Paella is a Valencian-Catalan word which derives from the Old French word paelle for pan, which in turn comes from the Latin word patella for pan as well.  Patella is also akin to the modern French poêle, the Italian padella and the Old Spanish padilla.

Valencians use the word paella for all pans, including the specialized shallow pan used for cooking paellas. However, in most other parts of Spain and throughout Latin America, the term paellera is more commonly used for this pan, though both terms are correct, as stated by the Royal Spanish Academy, the body responsible for regulating the Spanish language.  Paelleras are traditionally round, shallow and made of polished steel with two handles.

A popular but inaccurate belief in Arabic-speaking countries is that the word paella derives from the Arabic word for leftovers, baqiyah, because it was customary among the servants of Moorish kings to combine the leftovers of a banquet for royal guests, purportedly leading to a paella-like creation in Moorish Spain.

Tempranillo (also known as Ull de Llebre, Cencibel, Tinto del Pais and several other synonyms) is a black grape variety widely grown to make full-bodied red wines in its native Spain.  Its name is the diminutive of the Spanish temprano ("early"), a reference to the fact that it ripens several weeks earlier than most Spanish red grapes. Tempranillo has been grown on the Iberian Peninsula since the time of Phoenician settlements.  It is the main grape used in Rioja, and is often referred to as Spain's noble grape. The grape has been planted throughout the globe in places such as Mexico, New Zealand, California, and Washington State.

Unlike more aromatic red wine varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir, Tempranillo has a relatively neutral profile and is often blended with other varieties, such as Grenache and Carignan (known in Rioja as Mazuelo), or aged for extended periods in oak (traditionally American Oak) where barrel notes impart more layered flavors. Varietal examples of Tempranillo usually exhibit flavors of plum and strawberries.

Tempranillo is an early ripening variety that tends to thrive in chalky vineyard soils such as those of the Ribera del Duero region of Spain. In Portugal, where the grape is known as Tinto Roriz and Aragonez, it is blended with others to produce Port wine.

In 1905, Frederic Bioletti brought Tempranillo to California where it received a cool reception not only due to the encroaching era of Prohibition, but also because of the grape's dislike of hot, dry climates. It was much later, during the 1980s that Californian Tempranillo wine production began to flourish, following the establishment of suitably mountainous sites. Production in this area has more than doubled since 1993.

During the 1990s, Tempranillo started experiencing a renaissance in wine production worldwide and Amphora has added its name to the list of fine California producers who make this historic and delicious wine.   

Time Posted: May 13, 2014 at 2:41 PM
Joelle Kurrus
April 1, 2014 | Joelle Kurrus

Vineyard Watch-What Springtime means to the Vines


I walked to the car this morning in the pouring rain and could barely hear myself think for the cacophony of bird song that filled the air.  Oh right, it’s spring.  That time of year when everything and well, everybody, fluffs up and shows off their colors.  In the vineyards this is happening too.  Tightly compacted buds formed the previous summer find the perfect ratio of temperature and daylight (called degree days) and before you know it, they’re bursting forth in a mighty push of leaves and flower clusters destined to be our next vintage.  The process is much like a telescoping wand and it never fails to amaze me how quickly it all happens.   A few points of interest regarding grapevines:  first of all propagation needs neither bee nor birdsong as the vines are self- pollinating and secondly, the flowers on a vine are so miniscule as to go virtually unnoticed by even careful observer.  The showy peach blossoms down the road at Dry Creek Peach and Produce will provide the best flower you can find in the valley but the lowly grapevine blooms, well, they're a yawn.  Soon after the flowering cycle, small bb-sized grapes appear all in green, no matter that vine produces red or green grapes they all start this way.  The transition of color for red grapes, called veraison, occurs around mid-July.  

The spring season in the vineyard requires many activities.  That beautiful crop of mustard and legumes that grew between the rows during the winter must be disked into the soil to create a vital nutrient package which encourages the greening of leaves and lightening of soil.   The vines must also be trained on their cordons and require the studied hand of the vineyard worker to maintain the fruiting line of the vine.  There are many types of trellising to be found in the vineyard and it’s fun while driving down Dry Creek Road to name the different styles you see.  Overall, the vineyard is a dynamic growing place and vineyard managers and growers alike look to keep all things in balance so that fruit and canopy are proportionate to root systems and particularly this year,  to irrigation strategies.  If all goes well, the harvest will produce a vintage unique to all others, created by the conditions of the particular year, the craft of farmer, and the art of the winemaker.   Each element will be reflected in that amazing bottle you’ll drink to toast the awakening of a future Spring.


Time Posted: Apr 1, 2014 at 4:53 PM
Joelle Kurrus
January 28, 2014 | Joelle Kurrus

An Italian Dinner for two

Love is in the air at Amphora and if you're like me, a special celebration is in order for Valentines Day.  Truth be told, I'm not much on those overpriced roses or crowded restaurants.  No, for me nothing says "I love you" more than a specially prepared meal at home. Light the candles, toss a log on the fire and of course, open a bottle of delicous Amphora wine.  With that in mind,  I asked a my foodie friends here at the winery to help me construct a memorable dinner for you and your love.  Requirements included easy prep, and most importantly, perfectly paired with the Amphora Italian Collection for the month of February.  What's this you ask?  The collection is made up of three amazing Cal/Italian varietals: 2010 Teroldego, 2007 Sangiovese, and 2010 Barbera.  We've packaged them in stunning burgundy wine bags and tucked in the famous Italian chocolate Baci Perugina for you to share with your Valentine- specially priced and with $5 shipping.

First Course:

Grilled Artichokes with lemon Aioli

* artichokes
1 lemon (juice)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 clove garlic (chopped)
salt and pepper to taste

1. Cut the top off of the artichoke.
2. Trim the outer leaves with scissors.
3. Cut the artichokes into quarters.
4. Remove the fuzzy centers and scratchy leaves.
5. Soak in lemon water until ready to cook.
6. Cook in a pot of salted water until tender.
7. Drain and squeeze out the excess water.
8. Toss the artichokes with the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper.
9. Grill the artichokes until golden brown.
Lemon Aioli

1/2 cup mayonnaise
1 clove garlic (chopped)
1 lemon (juice and zest)
salt and pepper to taste

1. Mix everything.


Pork Chops alla Pizzaiola

Recipe courtesy of Giada De Laurentiis

Total Time:37 min   Prep:7 min   Cook:30 min
Yield:2 servings
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 (1-inch thick) bone-in pork loin center-cut chops (about 12 ounces each)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 (15-ounce) can diced tomatoes, in juice
1 teaspoon herbes de Provence
1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes, or more to taste
1 tablespoon chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves

Heat the oil in a heavy large skillet over medium heat. Sprinkle the pork chops with salt and pepper. Add the pork chops to the skillet and cook until they are brown and an instant-read meat thermometer inserted horizontally into the pork registers 160 degrees F, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer the pork chops to a plate and tent with foil to keep them warm.

Add the onion to the same skillet and saute over medium heat until crisp-tender, about 4 minutes. Add the tomatoes with their juices, herbes de Provence, and 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes. Cover and simmer until the flavors blend and the juices thicken slightly, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes. Season the sauce, to taste, with salt and more red pepper flakes. Return the pork chops and any accumulated juices from the plate to the skillet and turn the pork chops to coat with the sauce.

Place 1 pork chop on each plate. Spoon the sauce over the pork chops. Sprinkle with the parsley and serve.

Side Dish

Orzo With Wilted Spinach and Pine Nuts

Original recipe makes 8 servings Change Serving quantity or make a little extra for next day lunch.

1 (16 ounce) packageuncooked orzo

1/2 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons butter

1/2 teaspoon minced garlic

1/2 teaspoon dried basil

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1 cup pine nuts

1 (10 ounce) bag baby spinach

1/8 cup balsamic vinegar

1 (8 ounce) package crumbled feta cheese

1/2 fresh tomato, chopped

salt to taste


Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook for 8 to 10 minutes. (Firm or slightly undercooked orzo works best for this dish.) Drain, transfer to a mixing bowl, and set aside.
Heat olive oil and butter in a large skillet over medium high heat, stirring to blend. Stir in garlic, basil, and red pepper flakes, and reduce heat to medium. Stir in pine nuts and cook until lightly browned. Add spinach, cover, and cook on low heat for 5 minutes, or until spinach is wilted.
Toss spinach mixture with orzo pasta. Portion onto serving plates with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar and a sprinkling of crumbled feta cheese and chopped tomatoes.


Italian Affogato - Affogato al Caffe

Ingredients Per Person:

1 scoop good-quality vanilla ice cream or gelato*
1 shot (1 1/2 ounces) freshly brewed hot espresso or 1/3 cup strongly-brewed coffee

* You could substitute any flavor of coffee you would like. Chocolate and coffee-flavored ice creams also taste great!


Brew the coffee according to the preparation and strength of your desire.

In a small dessert glass or coffee cup, scoop the ice cream or gelato. Pour the hot prepared coffee or espresso over the top of the ice cream.


Buon Appetito with love from Amphora

Time Posted: Jan 28, 2014 at 5:02 PM
Amphora Winery
January 20, 2014 | Amphora Winery

Winemaker Dinner February 8, 2014


Saturday, February 8, 2014 will be an evening to remember as Rick and Bridget welcome you to our annual Winemaker Dinner.  Chef Martin Courtman will provided a sumptuous menu including  Wild Mushroom and  Truffle Oil Ragout, Black Angus Beef Tenderloin with Walnut Risotto,  and a Chocolate Decadence Cake with Fresh Raspberry Coulis and Creme Chantilly   Rick will be pouring exceptional vintages of some of our favorite varietals both in pre-release, current release, and library selections.


So gather friends together and make it a special night at


                                                                          Tickets $140/ $120 club  per person and are available here or by calling 707-431-7767.

Amphora Winery
December 10, 2013 | Amphora Winery

Many thanks for your participation

Guests at the Amphora holiday party, who visited with us last Saturday, helped provide needed donations to our local charities by bringing along wonderful toys for children's center and food items for the senior pantry.  These gifts will make such a big impact in the lives of those most in need in our community and we hoped it filled your hearts with the spirit of the season.

Time Posted: Dec 10, 2013 at 2:14 PM
Amphora Winery
June 10, 2013 | Amphora Winery

Little Rickie getting ready for the luau

Little Rickie getting ready for Amphora's annual Luau.  Are you going to join the fun?

Time Posted: Jun 10, 2013 at 9:54 AM
Amphora Winery
May 24, 2013 | Amphora Winery

Amphora Mentioned in the Huffington Post

Great mention and article in the Huffington Post!


Time Posted: May 24, 2013 at 9:15 AM
Amphora Winery
May 12, 2013 | Amphora Winery

Happy Mother's Day!

To all of the mothers out there, Amphora wants you to know you are appreciated!  Come by the tasting room on May 12th for a free tasting on us.

Time Posted: May 12, 2013 at 10:15 AM